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The site is depicted & annotated as "Old Windmill" on OS 25" County Series Map of 1877 with an apparently working windmill some 100m to the south where there are 2 buildings annotated "Windmill" - it's not clear if this is just the name given to the buildings or if there was indeed a working windmill there. During the 18th century, Sir Humphrey Mackworth's Charity School at Neath for his miners' children & Nevill's Free Schools at Llanelly during the early years of the 19th century wre the earliest.

The Windmill acted as a navigation mark for vessels aligning Porthcawl harbour breakwater, Porthcawl Inn & the westenmost extend of the notorious Nash Sands. The second phase (1820-1860) saw the development of the heavy industries which necessitated the sinking of large numbers of new pits to meet the high fuel demands.

The OS 6 inch sheet (Glamorgan XL) records "human remains" as having been found on Stormy Down in 1870, near the southern limit of the so called "Danish Camp" but nothing appears to be known of these remains.

The present burial lay some 350 yards North-West of this discovery.

A derelict, short upriight tower stands near Mount Pleasant Farm of the edge of an escarpment at an elevation of 307 feet. Such schools were primarily for colliers' children, but, as in other "works" schools, children of other work-people took advantage of such educational facilities provided there were vacancies or "places" in these schools.

This is the remains of a type of primitive, shorter, parallel-sided windmill (similar to ones across the channel in Somerset). The establishment of colliery schools in South Wales followed very closely the various phases of development of coal mining.

The bulk of the references collected are 12th & 13th century - as they have all been taken from the C. The final phase (from 1860 onwards) was associated with the rapid devleopment of the central Glamorgan coalfield, especially the steam-coal deposits of the Rhondda Valleys (for export purposes). Talbot MP of the Margam Estate (Owner of Bryndu Slip Colliery) started a temporary school in colliery stables, known as Bryndu Works School. Instruction as good as could be carried into effect during the short time the school has been erected; discipline good; methods good.

The game of rugby football grew up in the mining community of Kenfig Hill with the village functioning as a club during the mid 1890's - the team wore blue & white squared jerseys and played home games on a field called "Cae Rhys" which was located along Stormy Road.The bones, though sodden, were mostly well preserved, although the more spongy parts had largely decayed and the upper portions had been damaged when the grave was first discovered. It may have been lost in the course of building the grave, entering later with the soil. Camb., 1919, p345)) - the present example may have been intended for use either as knife or scraper. Fleure & Mr Sansbury (see Appendix below) has shown the skeleton to be that of an adult male in middle life & revealed features which suggest that the skull was "at least sub-brachycephalic," and that the individual may therefore have been of Beaker type.Fortunately the skull-fragments had been recovered & preserved and a report on these, for which I have to thank Prof. The flake (fig.4) shows a pronounced bulb of percussion at the thicker end; the opposite end is rounded and with the left-hand side, brought to an edge by secondary working. Cists of somewhat similar type associated with Beaker-burials are described by John Ward in his account of "Prehistoric Burials, Merthyr Mawr Warren, Glamorgan (Arch. Camb., 1925, p 11) at the beginning of the Bronze Age.Flints of this or similar type are common in Bronze Age burials (Eg., at Pendine, Carm. Camb., 1919, pp 323-352) & it seems probable that the man buried on Stomry Down was a member of the "colony" of the broad-headed people which occupied the coastal regions of South Wales - coming, perhaps from the Somerset side of the Bristol Channel (A suggestion offered by Dr Cyril Fox, F. Estimating the breadth of the skull from the parieto-occipital region, which it has been possible to build up from fragments, we get a measurement of 149mm suggesting that the maximum breadth of the skull is a little greater than this.It was not possible to place in contact with this portion a fragment of the frontal bone which was present.

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